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The Japanese American Leadership Symposium in Fukushima "Towards Common Ground: Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future"


The Japanese American Leadership Symposium in Fukushima
Towards Common Ground: 
Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future

Thumbnail of Report on the Japanese American Leadership Symposium in Fukushima

Report on the Japanese American Leadership Symposium in Fukushima

"Towards Common Ground: Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future" (PDF:1.54MB)

This symposium has finished.

The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP) organizes the Japanese American Leadership Symposium under the auspices of The Japanese American Leadership Delegation (JALD) program with assistance from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the U.S.-Japan Council (USJC) (please click here for more information on JALD). This year’s theme is “Towards Common Ground: Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future”.

The earthquake of March 11 divided many communities in Fukushima. In the process of rebuilding these proud but broken communities, the thoughts and concerns of the local residents must be heard, shared, and connected, to build common ground.

It is necessary to share the voices of individuals - their thoughts and local knowledge - to craft robust and sustainable government policy. It is equally important to make the voices of these individuals heard throughout Japan and the rest of the world in order to dispel false rumors while ensuring the memories and lessons learned from the earthquake never fade. Furthermore, messages of encouragement from people throughout the world should continue to be delivered to these affected communities. Combined, these elements will encourage residents and contribute to the rebuilding of their communities.

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake, it was Japanese Americans throughout the United States who were among the first to respond to the needs of the affected areas. Japanese Americans contribute enormously both in their respective fields of work and community and act as a bridge between the U.S. and Japan. This symposium will invite three Japanese Americans leaders along with Dr. Mitsuo Yamakawa, Director of Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization, Fukushima University (FURE), to share their experiences, address the importance and methodology of passing on the narratives of the communities, and explore possible collaborations between the U.S. and Japan.

Read an essay on the symposium contributed from Irene Hirano Inouye in Wochi Kochi Magazine.

Sharing "Voices" of Fukushima with the Young Japanese American Leadersをちこち

schedule
Date & Time

Sunday, March 10, 2013
3:00 PM - 5:30 PM  Symposium (Doors open at 2:30 PM)
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM  Reception

Venue:

Conference Hall, Corasse Fukushima
 1-20 Mikawa-Minami-cho, Fukushima, 960-8053 JAPAN Access

Organized by:

The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP)

Co-Organized by:

U.S.-Japan Council (USJC)
Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization, Fukushima
University (FURE) (PDF:External link)

Supported by:

Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Fukushima Prefecture
U.S. Embassy, Tokyo
Fukushima International Association
NHK Fukushima

Admission:

Free

Language:

Japanese and English (Simultaneous Translation Provided)

Program: 
3:00-3:10

Opening remark

  • - Mr. Eiji Taguchi, Executive Vice President of the Japan Foundation
  • - Mr. Fumio Murata, Vice-Governor of Fukushima Prefecture
3:10-4:15

[Session 1] Presentations from Japanese Americans

(1) Introduction: Ms. Irene Hirano Inouye
(2) Screening of short film about history of Japanese American produced by Japanese American National Museum.
(3) Screening of short film about the exhibition, “Art of Gaman”.
(4) Presentation from JALD Panelists

  • - Emily Murase, 滴ome, Community, change: What will your adventure be?
  • - Marion Friebus-Flaman, 釘uilding Common Ground
  • - Kelly Ogilvie, 鉄ocial Entrepreneurship and the Hero Generation
4:15-4:25
[Break]
4:25-5:30

[Session 2] Discussion

(1) Introduction by Dr David Slater
(2) Presentation from Professor Mitsuo Yamakawa, Director of FURE
(3) Discussion Moderated by Dr David Slater

5:30
Closing
Participants:

<Moderator>
David Slater, Director of Institute of Comparative Culture and Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Sophia University

<Coordinator>
Irene Hirano Inouye, President, US-Japan Council

<Panelists> 
Marion Friebus-Flaman, School Principal, Thomas Dooley Elementary School
Emily Murase, Executive Director, San Francisco Department on the Status of Women
Kelly Ogilvie, Founder, Chairman, President and Chief Operating Officer Quemulus, Inc.
Mitsuo Yamakawa, Director of Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization of Fukushima University / Head Director of Fukushima International Association


Please RSVP with the following information by Friday, March 8th, 2013.

  1. Name
  2. Title/ Affiliation
  3. Contact Information (Tel / E-mail)
  4. Attendance: Symposium (15:00 17:30) / Reception (18:00 20:00)

*Your personal information including your name and affiliation will be used only for the registration procedure of the symposium.

<Contact about the Symposium>
The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership, Tokyo
Tel: 03-5369-6072  FAX: 03-5369-6042
E-mail: cgpinfo@jpf.go.jp
(When sending an e-mail, please enter a half-width character "@" instead of a full-width character "@.")

■Biography of Participants

David Slater

Photo of David Slater

David H. Slater is Director of the Institute of Comparative Culture and Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology in the Faculty of Liberal Arts at Sophia University. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and joined Sophia University in 1997. His research primarily focuses on the youth and education, and the trend of labor market in Japan in after 1990s, and has written articles and books including Social Class in Contemporary Japan: Structures, Sorting and Strategies (Routledge, 2011). After March 2011, he started volunteer activity with his students in the affected areas. He is also participating in the activities to provide "kokoro no care (mental health-care).” His publications include “HOT SPOTS: 3.11 POLITICS IN DISASTER JAPAN” and “Social Media, Information and Political Activism in Japan’s 3.11 Crisis.” His most recent edited book is Ethnographies of Disaster: Post 3.11 Tohoku (forthcoming). He is currently directing the “Tohoku Voices”project, which is to produce a video archive of narratives of local residents in the area. He has recorded several hundred hours of interviews so far with his students for the project.

Irene Hirano Inouye (Washington D.C.)

Photo of IRENE HIRANO INOUYE

Irene Hirano Inouye is President of the U.S.-Japan Council, a non-profit organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., dedicated to building people-to-people relationships between the United States and Japan. She is the former President and founding CEO of the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, a position she held for twenty years.A recipient of bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Public Administration from the University of Southern California, Ms. Hirano has extensive experience in nonprofit administration, community education and public affairs with culturally diverse communities nationwide. Ms. Hirano’s professional and community activities include serving as Chair, and Trustee Ford Foundation, Trustee and immediate past chair, Kresge Foundation; Trustee, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Trustee, Washington Center, and Trustee, Independent Sector. She was married to the late Senator Daniel K. Inouye of Hawaii. Prefecture in Japan of ancestral origins: paternal side from Fukuoka, maternal side from Tokyo.

Marion Friebus-Flaman (Schaumburg, IL)

Photo of MARION FREIBUS-FLAMAN

Marion Friebus-Flaman is the Principal of Thomas Dooley Elementary School in Schaumburg, IL. She has participated in the planning and development of a Japanese-English Dual Language program at the school, where half the students are native speakers of Japanese and half are native speakers of English. By the time they finish 6th grade, the goal is for each student to be bilingual, bi-literate and bi-cultural. This program is the first of its kind in the U.S. Dr. Friebus-Flaman spent the first six years of her life in Japan, and prior to her time with the Schaumburg School District, she spent six additional years as a foreign lecturer/instructor at two Japanese national universities. She has served as a member of the Illinois English Language Learner Assessment Advisory Committee and the Illinois Governor’s Task Force on Growth Models. Dr. Friebus-Flaman holds a B.A. in English from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, M.A. in TESL from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, M.S. in Educational Administration from Northern Illinois University and Ph.D. in Education from Capella University. Prefecture in Japan of ancestral origins: Fukushima (maternal grandfather); Kumamoto (maternal grandmother).

Emily Murase (San Francisco, CA)
Photo of Emily Murase

Emily Murase serves as Executive Director of the San Francisco Department on the Status of Women, where she oversees a $3.5 million budget to promote the human rights of the women and girls of San Francisco. Previously, she served in the first Clinton White House as Director for International Economic Affairs (1993-1994), after working for AT&T Japan in Tokyo, and she later worked in the International Bureau of the Federal Communications Commission. In 2010, Dr. Murase was elected to the San Francisco Board of Education and is the first Japanese American to serve on the school board. In 2009, Emily was named Woman of the Year by California State Senator Leland Yee and was recognized for her contributions to the women's community by the Democratic Women's Forum. Dr. Murase holds an A.B. in modern Japanese history from Bryn Mawr College (including a year at Tsuda College in Tokyo), a Master’s degree from the Graduate School of International Relations & Pacific Studies at UC San Diego, and a Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford. Prefecture in Japan of ancestral origins: paternal side from Yamaguchi, maternal side from Aomori. 

Kelly Ogilvie (Seattle, WA)

Photo of Kelly Ogilvie

Kelly Ogilvie is Founder, Chairman, President and Chief Operating Officer of Quemulus, Inc., an “e-wallet” application accessible from a website and mobile devices. He is also Founding Partner of Social Milli, LLC, a social media consultancy that advises small and medium sized businesses on social media strategy. Prior to founding Quemulus and Social Milli, Mr. Ogilvie was Founder, CEO and President of Blue Marble Biomaterials. Before that time, Mr. Ogilvie worked with the Seattle Chamber of Commerce to promote business interests in Washington State, and also worked for Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s Vulcan Real Estate division on developing the South Lake Union Corridor. He began his career in former Washington State Governor Gary Locke’s office coordinating outreach efforts. Mr. Ogilvie also spent time as Deputy Director for former Mayor of Seattle Greg Nickels and currently serves on the Board of Directors of Extraordinary Futures and the External Advisory Board of Washington State University’s Center for Environmental Research Education and Outreach. He attended Seattle University, where he received a B.A. in Humanities and International Business. Prefecture in Japan of ancestral origins: unknown.

Mitsuo Yamakawa

Photo of Mitsuo Yamakawa

Mitsuo Yamakawa was born in Aichi Prefecture in 1947. He is a specialist in economic geography. He became a professor of the Faculty of Economics at Fukushima University in 1990. During his career, he has served as head of the Faculty of Economics and Vice President of the university. He is currently Special Advisor to the President and a professor of Economics and Business Administration. Professor Yamakawa is an official member of the Science Council of Japan and Head Director of Fukushima International Association. In July 2011, Professor Yamakawa assumed the position of Director of Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization, a center established at Fukushima University with the objective of assisting the affected areas and disaster victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake. Before the Great East Japan Earthquake, Professor Yamakawa served on and headed various local commissions and committees, including the Fukushima Prefecture City Planning Commission and the Fukushima Prefecture Small and Medium Enterprise Promotion Commission; following the earthquake, Professor Yamakawa has spearheaded reconstruction efforts in Fukushima Prefecture by overseeing numerous local government boards tasked with drafting reconstruction plans. One such example is his work to draft a reconstruction vision for the prefecture as a member of the Fukushima Prefecture Reconstruction Vision Committee. Professor Yamakawa emphasizes raw data gathered in the field when approaching local problems. He has authorized 26 books and 79 academic papers.

 

 

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