Skip to main content

Taking Steps toward Recovery through Culture

  • To Support Recovery from the Great East Japan Earthquake

    In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011, the Japan Foundation endeavored to promote deeper understanding of Japan, aiming to connect the devastated region with the world through cultural exchange and the sense of international solidarity enhanced by the catastrophe.

    Sharing Japan's experiences in disaster and recovery with the international community, the Japan Foundation showcased the intrinsic charms of the Tohoku region through various cultural projects implemented in and outside Japan.

  • Sendai Philharmonic Orchestra Concert Tour in Russia
  • Lectures with Exhibition "How Did Architects
Respond Immediately after 3/11"(BUSAN)
  • Lectures with Exhibition "How Did Architects
Respond Immediately after 3/11"(SEOUL)

    Lectures with Exhibition "How Did Architects Respond Immediately after 3/11"
    The traveling exhibition in Korea accompanied lectures by an architect and an architectural historian. The experts discussed their activities in Tohoku immediately after the earthquake.

  • Sendai Philharmonic Orchestra Concert Tour in Russia
    Performances were held in Moscow and Saint Petersburg in an expression of gratitude for support in the wake of the earthquake and to show the people of Russia that the Japan is on a path to recovery (see1),(see2).
    (Photo Bottom: Foyer of a concert venue)

    Foyer of a concert venue
  • JISHIN ITSUMO

    Exhibition, Seminar, and Workshop JISHIN ITSUMO
    A project was introduced in Thailand to inject creative ideas into disaster preparedness (see1),(see2).

  • Symposium in Fukushima Towards Common Ground-Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future

    Symposium in Fukushima "Towards Common Ground-Connecting Diverse Voices for the Future"
    Japanese-Americans explored the possibilities of Japan-U.S. collaboration toward disaster recovery with citizens in Fukushima (see).

  • Photo of Kizuna Project

    Kizuna Project
    Some 1,200 U.S.high school students visited the disaster-stricken region for exchange and joined volunteer activities. They presented a banner to cheer up the residents (see1),(see2).