Hiraizumi-Temples and Gardens Representing the Buddhist Pure Land Held at the Japan Cultural Institute in Paris until July 30

Banner of exhibition Hiraizumi-Temples and Gardens Representing the Buddhist Pure Land

Photo of The Golden Hall of Chusonji Temple
The Golden Hall of Chusonji Temple

The Japan Foundation now holds a photo exhibition "Hiraizumi-Temples and Gardens Representing the Buddhist Pure Land" at the Japan Cultural Institute in Paris to celebrate the registration of Hiraizumicho, Nishiiwaigun, Iwate prefecture on the list of UNESCO World Heritage site.

Sixteen photo panels capturing architectures and gardens of Chusonji Temple, Motsuji Temple and Kanjizaioin-ato in Hiraizumi, which has first been designated as UNESCO World Heritage site in Tohoku region, are displayed. Works of Hidehiranuri (Japanese lacquerware), traditional crafts of Hiraizumi, are also presented at the photo exhibition.

Hiraizumi surrounded by the great nature of Tohoku region with distinct four seasons expresses the Buddhist Pure Land peculiar to Japan through Buddhist temple architectures and a series of gardens.

Exhibition term: June 24 to July 30, 2011

Venue: The Japan Cultural Institute in Paris Ground Floor
Host: The Japan Foundation / The Japan Cultural Institute in Paris
Corporation: Iwate prefecture, Hiraizumicho, Chusonji Temple, Motsuji Temple
Sponsorship: Embassy of Japan in France, Permanent Delegation of Japan to UNESCO
Official Website of the Japan Cultural Institute in Paris (in French)

Hiraizumi

Photo of The Garden of Motsuji Temple
The Garden of Motsuji Temple

Hiraizumi located by Kitakami river and Koromogawa river started its history when the first Kiyohira Fujiwara (The founder of the Fujiwara clan) had considered it a strategic spot of both channel and land transportation at the end of 11th century. In 1124, the construction of the Golden Hall of Chusonji Temple was completed by Kiyohira Fujiwara. After Kiyohira had passed away, Motsuji Temple was built by the second Motohira Fujiwara and the third Hidehira Fujiwara. Hidehira completed the construction of Hiraizumi by redeveloping the area, Hiraizumi-no-tachi, including the present Yanagi-no-gosho-iseki(The ruins of Kiyohira's residence), building the political center of Muryokoin(The temple designed to resemble Amida Hall of Byodoin, Kyoto), Kyaragosho (Hidehira's residence), and locating great temples at important sites.
Though Hiraizumi gradually fell into a decline after the fall of the Fujiwara clan in 1189, as a result of the restoration and preservation of old architectures and the succession of traditional arts and crafts being promoted due to the recent movement of preservation of ruins, "Hiraizumi-Temples, Gardens and Archaeological Sites Representing the Buddhist Pure Land" was designated as UNESCO World Heritage site by the 35th World Heritage Committee.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation
Arts and Culture Dept. Visual Arts Section
Person in charge: (Ms.) Murakami
4-4-1 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0004
Tel:03-5369-6062 FAX:03-5369-6038

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