TAIKO LEGEND - Heart Beat from Japan: Repertories

Brief description of repertories

1. "Ichiban Taiko / Chakuto"

(The first sound of Taiko Drums, announcing the opening of a theater) - Traditional piece

Photo of Eitetsu Hayashi performing 1

Appearance:Eitetsu Hayashi, two from FU-UN no KAI, Makoto Takei

Up until the first part of the 20th century, people in Japan used to play taiko early in the morning on the performance days of the Kabuki Theaters. (Kabuki Theaters start in the morning and continue into early evening with various repertoires.) The current practice has been to play the taiko at the house opening. "Chakuto" is a traditional theater jargon which means the actor has arrived in the dressing room, and the word has also been attributed to a short taiko piece accompanied by a Japanese vertical flute traditionally played to open the curtain. Appearance:Eitetsu Hayashi, two from FU-UN no KAI, Makoto Takei Up until the first part of the 20th century, people in Japan used to play taiko early in the morning on the performance days of the Kabuki Theaters. (Kabuki Theaters start in the morning and continue into early evening with various repertoires.) The current practice has been to play the taiko at the house opening. "Chakuto" is a traditional theater jargon which means the actor has arrived in the dressing room, and the word has also been attributed to a short taiko piece accompanied by a Japanese vertical flute traditionally played to open the curtain.

2. "Mitsumai" (Three dances) Composed by Eitetsu Hayashi

Appearance:Eitetsu Hayashi, two from FU-UN no KAI, Makoto Takei

A motif reminiscent of matsuri bayashi (japanese folk-festive music) is the basic phrase of this piece. Shimedaiko has high-pitched tone compared to other Japanese drums, and traditionally accompanied other instruments such as the vertical flute and mini-timpani to make festive tunes for Japanese street festivals. This piece features the characteristics of Shimedaiko and has the vital structure of a taiko ensemble piece. The original piece requires a Japanese flute player.

3. "Umino Hojo (sho)" (Abundance of the Ocean — Excerpts)
Composed by Eitetsu Hayashi

Photo of Eitetsu Hayashi performing 2

Appearance:Eitetsu Hayashi, FU-UN no KAI

Taiko drums are set up on both sides of the players who are required to beat them with big acrobatic movements. The image of a series of small islands lined up across the horizon of the Setonaikai Inland Sea is the inspiration of this piece. If you would imagine taiko drums set on the stage to be the small islands; the drummers as the bridges across those islands or as the people who live on those islands—the piece embodies the abundance of resources and relationships between the Inner Sea, the islands and islander's lives. The full version requires 5 drummers whereas tonight, a shorter version will be played by 3 drummers featuring the same movements.

4. "tension " Composed by Mikita Hase

Photo of FU-UN no KAI performing

Appearance:FU-UN no KAI

"Inorganic" sound, "dr" sound, "fulfilling" sound, "transcending" sound, "transparent" sound, "rough" sound, "boiling" sound".. the various tension of sounds are expressed with a simple Shime-daiko.

5. Shakuhachi/Japanese Bamboo flute solo performance

Appearance:Makoto Takei

Ranging from the traditional to the contemporary and experimental, fantastic techniques and performance with simple instrument leads audiences to feel the beauty of sound and depth of expression.

6. "Mio no Hasu Suite"(A Lotus Flower along the Water Channel)
Conposed/Choreographed / Directed by Eitetsu Hayashi

Photo of Eitetsu Hayashi performing 3

Appearance:Eitetsu Hayashi, FU-UN no KAI

The Mio no Hasu Suite uses the life story of Takumi Asakawa, a forestry scholar from the period of Japanese colonization of Korea as the theme. The suite is made up of independent pieces that come together to form a theatrical work, with an audust theme that illustrates the empathy between Man and Nature. It opens with a prelude by a single o-daiko, followed by the use of the Dengaku Taiko technique to complement the cutting-edge choreography of the images of the ancient deities "Yama Sachi", then a solo performance of an o-daiko to depict the praying and calling to the Universe, before the emergence of the deities "Umi Sachi" to show the interaction between human and Nature under the powerful waves of the ocean, bringing the work to a climatic close.

[Contact Us]

Mariko KONNO (Ms)
Performing Arts Devision, Art and Culture Department, JAPAN FOUNDATION
Tel. +81 (0)3-5369-6063 Fax. +81 (0)3-5369-6038

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