"KAKEHASHI Project" Chienkan Senior High School (Saga Pref.)

Dispatch in March 2014

Group 5 (High School Students)
Chienkan Senior High School (Saga Pref.)

Period: March 16 - 29, 2014
Local Visit Destination: Riverwood International Charter School (Georgia)
Number of Participants: 25

Tour Photo Album

Photo taken at Northwest University 1
School exchange at Northwest University
(Presentation)

Photo taken at Northwest University 2
School exchange at Northwest University

Photo taken at Kamiak High School
School exchange at Kamiak High School

Photo taken at at Ridgeview Charter Middle School 1
Welcome event at Ridgeview Charter Middle School

Photo taken at Riverwood International Charter School 1
School exchange at Riverwood International Charter School
(Presentation)

Photo taken at Riverwood International Charter School 2
School exchange at Riverwood International Charter School
(Presentation)

Photo taken at Riverwood International Charter School 3
School exchange at Riverwood International Charter School
(Presentation)

Photo taken at Riverwood International Charter School 4
School exchange at Riverwood International Charter School
(Participating in class)

Photo taken at Riverwood International Charter School 5
School exchange at Riverwood International Charter School
(Participating in class)

Photo taken at Ridgeview Charter Middle School 2
Community event at Ridgeview Charter Middle School
 

Photo taken at Ridgeview Charter Middle School 3
Leaving Ridgeview Charter Middle School for host families' house

Photo taken at Ridgeview Charter Middle School 4
Leaving Ridgeview Charter Middle School for host families' house

Voices from Participants

1. What impressed you most in this experience of promoting the charms of Japan in the U.S.?

  • Until I made the actual presentation, I was worried about the local people's response to Japanese culture. But many of the high school and university students I met were studying about Japan. They made a big reaction to topics they already knew, or showed curiosity about topics they did not know. I could tell they enjoyed our presentation and the U.S. students are not as shy as we are. They made honest reactions, offered their views, and asked questions. Their outgoing attitude left a big impression on me. Gaining a deeper understanding of each other's culture in that vibrant atmosphere was a very good experience.
  • It filled me with happiness when the students at the schools we visited listened enthusiastically to our presentation. They were really outgoing and not afraid to ask questions about topics that interested them. Sometimes we were stuck for answers, and it made me realize that I need a deeper understanding of Japanese culture. This was the lesson I learned: one must do research and study the culture of one's own country before sharing it with people of another country.

2. What would you like to pass on to people in your community and school after you return to Japan?

  • There are many people in the world. Traveling abroad is a good way to absorb a wider range of lifestyles and views. I hope to tell others about the importance of international exchange, including mastering a foreign language and interacting with a greater number of people. Also as I learned that there is still a gap between the rich and the poor, and racial discrimination, in the United States, I hope to draw on what I found through the project and get others to think about steps we can take in the future.
  • I want to share everything I learned and experienced, especially charms of North American, including its lifestyle that is different from ours. I hope to motivate people to travel abroad and become more outgoing. I think I became a lot more outgoing thanks to the project. It gave me a good opportunity to change myself. I want to share this point, too.

3. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • From the moment I arrived in the United States, I encountered several surprises, marveled at its atmosphere, and met people unlike anyone I had ever met before. It was 10 days packed with nonstop excitements. Next time, I hope to take a longer trip there and experience more of its wonders and even its failings. To do this, I need to brush up my English a lot more first. Being able to communicate in English will make a difference in life, I think. I want to discuss things in greater depth with the locals and absorb different ideas and perspectives.
  • I learned so much through this project. I could feel the bridge — the KAKEHASHI — forming between the Japanese and U.S. high school students, and I look forward to further exchanges in the future. I also found a new dream through the trip. I hope to chase this dream and build an even bigger bridge. My experience during these two weeks helped me realize that many challenges remain to be resolved. I hope to identify my own faults and discover how to make up for them. Moreover, I would like to use my time wisely and make every day count.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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