"KAKEHASHI Project" Gojin (Fukushima Pref.)

Dispatch in March 2014

Group 5 (High School Students)
Gojin (Fukushima Pref.)

Period: March 16 - 29, 2014
Local Visit Destination: Paul Public Charter School (Washington, D.C.)
Number of Participants: 24

Tour Photo Album

Photo taken at La Conner High School 1
School exchange at La Conner High School

Photo taken at La Conner High School 2
School exchange at La Conner High School
(Presentation)

Photo taken at La Conner High School 3
School exchange at La Conner High School
(Presentation)

Photo taken at La Conner High School 4
School exchange at La Conner High School
(Participating in class)

Photo taken at Seattle Fukushima Kenjinkai
Seattle Fukushima Kenjinkai
(Learning about local culture)

Photo taken with host families
Meeting with host families

Photo taken at National Cherry Blossom Festival 1
National Cherry Blossom Festival
(Performance)

Photo taken at National Cherry Blossom Festival 2
National Cherry Blossom Festival
(Performance)

Photo taken at Paul Public Charter School 1
School exchange at Paul Public Charter School
(Participating in class)

Photo taken at Paul Public Charter School 2
School exchange at Paul Public Charter School
(Participating in class)

Photo taken at Paul Public Charter School 3
School exchange at Paul Public Charter School

Photo taken at Community event at Paul Public Charter School
Community event at Paul Public Charter School

Voices from Participants

1. What impressed you most in this experience of promoting the charms of Japan in the U.S.?

  • Every time we gave the presentation, our audience gave us big responses. We received applause and even quite a few standing ovations, which are rarely seen in Japan. This came as a surprise to me who was actually dancing. I believe that our feelings even if only partly reached the audience, and this was a moving experience.
  • It was happy to find out that the people in the U.S. considered Japan as a beautiful country and thought Japanese cuisine was good. I also discovered that many people knew quite a lot about Japan and that they found Japanese very difficult to learn.

2. What would you like to pass on to people in your community and school after you return to Japan?

  • I want to share all about the KAKEHASHI Project, including whether people in the U.S. understood our yosakoi dance, in detail, without any omission. I think I should also share what I thought Japan or the Japanese lack. We need to learn from outgoing nature of people in the U.S.
  • There was much to learn through the KAKEHASHI Project. I felt that the Japanese could be friendlier and more outgoing. We could learn so much from the Americans. I hope to share the qualities they have but we do not so that we can grow ourselves.

3. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I am glad I participated in this project. Performing abroad gave me a sense of satisfaction and achievement that I have never had while I was doing in Japan, and this was inspiring. I hope to incorporate the inspiration into my future performances. I also came into contact with authentic language that was completely different from what I learn in our English conversation lessons in school, and developed an interest in learning not only grammar but also phrases useful in daily conversation. On this trip I could not express all my feelings in English. One day I hope to go back to the United States and tell my new friends more about myself and about Japan.
  • I gained so much through the KAKEHASHI Project. I learned about a different culture, lifestyle, and history. I also made new friends internationally, and befriended the other participants from Japan. I am filled with gratitude for all the organizers. Thank you so much for an amazing experience.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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