"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: United States Institute of Peace

Invitation in January 2014

Short-term stay in Japan: U.S. Young Researchers Invitation
United States Institute of Peace

Period: January 12 – 22
Local Visit Destination: Hiroshima Prefecture
Number of Participants: 11

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation 1
Orientation
(Matthew S. Sussman, Executive Director of Fulbright Japan)

Photo of Orientation 2
Orientation
(Lecture on Japan's national security policy)

Photo of Orientation 3
Orientation
(Lecture on Japanese economy)

Photo of Orientation 4
Orientation
(Lecture on Japan's social policy)

Photo taken in Asakusa
Visit to Asakusa
(Learning about Japanese
history and culture)

Photo taken at Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Visit to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs



Photo taken at Tokyo National Museum
Visit to Tokyo National Museum
(Studying Japanese history and culture)

Photo taken in Akihabara
Visit to Akihabara
(Learning about 'Cool Japan')

Photo taken at Ministry of Defense
Visit to the Ministry of Defense

Photo taken at Japan Center for Conflict Prevention
Visit to Japan Center for Conflict Prevention

Photo taken at National Institute for Defense Studies
Visit to The National Institute for Defense Studies

Photo taken at Japan Institute of International Affairs
Visit to The Japan Institute of International Affairs

Photo taken at Hiroshima Prefectural Government
Visit to Hiroshima Prefectural Government

Photo taken at Hiroshima Peace Institute, Hiroshima City University
Visit to Hiroshima Peace Institute,
Hiroshima City University
(Learning about peacebuilding)

Photo taken at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Visit to Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
(Learning about peacebuilding)

Photo taken at Lecture by atomic bomb survivors
Lecture by atomic bomb survivors
(Learning about peacebuilding)

Photo taken at KAMOIZUMI SHUZOU & Co., Ltd. 1
Visit to KAMOIZUMI SHUZOU & Co., Ltd.
(Learning about Japanese local industries)

Photo taken at KAMOIZUMI SHUZOU & Co., Ltd. 2
Visit to KAMOIZUMI SHUZOU & Co., Ltd.
(Learning about Japanese local industries)

Photo of Miyajima-bori carving experience
Miyajima tray making
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

Photo taken at  Itsukushima Shrine 1
Visit to Itsukushima Shinto Shrine
(Learning about Japanese culture and history of the local area)

Photo taken at  Itsukushima Shrine 2
Visit to Itsukushima Shinto Shrine
(Learning about Japanese culture and history of the local area)

Photo taken at Shibuya Junior & Senior High School
Independent research
(Visit to Shibuya Junior & Senior High School)

Photo taken at Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
Independent research
(Visit to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA))

Photo taken at Chofu Aerospace Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
Visit to Chofu Aerospace Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency


Photo taken at Daiwa Securities Co., Ltd
Visit to Daiwa Securities Co., Ltd

Photo of Debriefing session 1
Debriefing session

Photo of Debriefing session 2
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan appears committed to continuing to strengthen its economy, enhancing its relations and role in the region, and expanding its role globally as a proactive contributor to peace. It is clear that Japan values its relationship with the United States, and strives to be a partner in each of these areas.
  • National Character/values: Japanese workers are extremely dedicated to their profession no matter what it may be. The strong work ethic and national pride have the potential, along with smart policy changes and social reforms, to rejuvenate Japanese economy. Identity/culture: Japanese civilization and culture is unique and very attractive to outsiders. Japan, with its vibrant pop culture, long history, highly developed art, and beautiful landscapes offers something interesting to everyone. With some rebranding, Japan could attract more students, tourists, artists, etc. National experience: Japan has transitioned many times in the modern age and has learned many lessons. Once an isolated island nation and then an imperial power defeated in World War Ⅱ, Japan knows the horror of war and is now dedicated to promoting peace. The country has credibility in international discussion on for disarmament, for example.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • Upon visiting Hiroshima, and Hiroshima Peace Memorial, I was struck by the city’s dedication to nonproliferation after suffering such an immense tragedy at the hands of a foreign aggressor. This commitment to peace is a model for other nations, and is one I did not realize prior to visiting Japan. I also was not aware of the many obstacles Japanese women still have to overcome in both societies, politics, and the economy. It is good to see, though, the significant strides the status of women has made since the end of World War Ⅱ.
  • I came in this trip with a strong impression of Japan. Our meetings only reinforced that sentiment. The lack of hostility toward the U.S. post-war was what shocked me most. I understand our deep ties, but assumed after the bombings that there may be resentment. I never saw such sentiments, which made me pleased as I appreciate our now close relationship.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I will be generally more interested in Japanese news and events. I will also follow their baseball league more closely.
  • ・The continued debate about the scope of the Japanese Self Defense Forces.
    ・More in-depth study of current and past relations with China.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I will be writing on nuclear energy in Japan which may be a model for US.
  • I will show pictures, tell stories, and write to friends and family. In addition, I want to keep in contact with Japanese people I met and more fully understand Japanese people and perspectives. I also will incorporate Japan into writing and thinking I do in the future.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • Since my background is in the Middle East and conflict resolution, I began this trip with only a moderate understanding of Japanese culture and politics. Our meetings truly strengthened my understanding, so I can now speak knowledgably. The cultural experiences were wonderful, truly my favorite part. Thank you so much for this opportunity.
  • I really enjoyed this trip! I enjoyed the diversity of experiences. I would perhaps have liked to meet more civil society actors or perhaps to have some social time with young Japanese, maybe over dinner or after dinner? It was a wonderful opportunity, and I am grateful for being offered it!

[Contact Us]

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