"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Marianas High School (Saipan)

Invitation in July 2013

Short-term stay in Japan: Group 3 (High School Students)
Marianas High School, Saipan

Period: July 8 - 18, 2013
Local Visit Destination: Saiki City, Oita Prefecture
Number of Participants: 25

Tour Photo Album

Photo taken at Edo-Tokyo Museum (Learning about traditional culture and history of Tokyo)
Visit to Edo-Tokyo Museum
(Learning about traditional culture and history of Tokyo)

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo taken at Tokyo National Museum (Studying Japanese history and culture)
Studying Japanese history and culture
(Tokyo National Museum)

Photo taken at Senso-ji/Nakamise in Asakusa  (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Visit to Senso-ji/Nakamise in Asakusa
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo taken at Beppu City Traditional Bamboo Crafts Center  (Experiencing Japanese local nature and culture)
Visit to Beppu City Traditional Bamboo Crafts Center
(Experiencing Japanese local nature and culture)

Photo of school exchange at Oita Prefectural Saiki Kakujo High School
School exchange at Oita Prefectural Saiki Kakujo High School

Photo of homestay experience
Homestay experience

Photo taken at Bungo Futamigaura (Experiencing Japanese local nature)
Visit to Bungo Futamigaura
(Experiencing Japanese local nature)

Photo takena at Usuki Sekibutsu, stone Buddhas (Experiencing Japanese local culture)
Visit to Usuki Sekibutsu, stone Buddhas
(Experiencing Japanese local culture)

Group photo taken at Meiji Shrine (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Visit to Meiji Shrine
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo taken at Tokyo Toy Museum (Japanese cultural experience)
Visit to Tokyo Toy Museum
(Japanese cultural experience)

Photo taken in Akihabara (Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)
Visit to Akihabara
(Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)

Group photo taken at the National Diet Building (Understanding Japanese society )
Visit to the National Diet Building
(Understanding Japanese society)

Photo taken at Mega Web, Toyota City Showcase
Visit to Mega Web, Toyota City Showcase
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

Photo taken at DiverCity Tokyo Plaza (Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)
Visit to DiverCity Tokyo Plaza
(Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)

Photo taken at Miraikan, The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)
Visit to Miraikan, The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

Photo of debriefing
Debriefing Session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I think some of Japan’s greatest strength and attractiveness are its society’s discipline, practicality, technology, and especially its pop culture. In Japan, respect and discipline are its greatest highlights no matter where I went. Even just in a small convenience store, the clerk welcomes every single customer that enters. Its people are also practical in use of anything, from bamboos to plastic and aluminum.
  • Japan’s strengths are their traditions, and how they stick their roots as well as how they still practice it even though we all live in a modern society. They treat everything with care and respect one another. This is one major aspect that attracts almost everyone. Their kind-hearts and their characteristics are very attractive. I also find all the sites like temples and monuments appealing.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • My first impression of Japan was mainly anime and modern technology, but when we first came here, the first thing I saw was the people welcoming us. Throughout the project, I thought Japan concentrates on religion and its roots were interesting.
  • I underestimated the ways and culture of Japan. This visit to this wonderful country was more of a shock to me. It changed the way I look at life now and how we should value life and make it better.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I really want to be fluent in Japanese, and to do this I have to learn to speak it even when I’m in the U.S. I want to learn more about the Edo period and about the bamboo museum we went to. And even if we weren’t able to see it, I wish to know more about the cherry blossom trees that Japanese and tourists go crazy about. I’m also interested in bonsai tree and how it came to be.
  • I would like to know how it would be like to be living alone in Japan as an adult and how to start a living there. I also want to know more about its pop culture and its traditional foods and religious practices.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I’d like to tell all of my friends and family about how great my trip was and why I think they should go to Japan. I would also like to keep contact with my Japanese friends and Japan Foundation itself. One day I’d like to help programs like this by working to bring Americans to Japan.
  • What I will do is whenever someone asks me about Japan, I will urge them to visit. Japan’s beauty, culture, tradition and charm actually cannot be put into mere words. It should be instead put into experiences. Words cannot begin to or even scratch the actual meaning of what it is to visit Japan.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • Since it was my first time here in Japan, it was a great experience. It widened my perspective of Japan. I understand they value culture and family, and I fell in love with the people because of their hospitality. They are also hardworking people which I value in all of them.
  • My experience was a life-changer. It was great! It opened my eyes to such a beautiful country! The KAKEHASHI Project cared for us and they took everything we needed and wanted into consideration. It was good that the government took part in this as well!

[Contact Us]

TEL: +81-(0)3-5369-6022
FAX: +81-(0)3-5369-6042
E-mail: infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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