"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: The Center for a New American Security (CNAS)

Invitation in September 2013

Short-term stay in Japan: U.S. Young Researchers Invitation
The Center for a New American Security (CNAS)

Period: September 29 - October 5, 2013
Local Visit Destination: Kyoto Prefecture
Number of Participants: 11

Tour Photo Album

Photo of orientation
Orientation

Photo taken at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Visit to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Photo of discussion with MOFA staff
Discussion with MOFA staff

Photo taken at the Ministry of Defense
Visit to the Ministry of Defense

Photo taken at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka
Visit to U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka

Photo taken at Japan Coast Guard, Yokohama Maritime Disaster Prevention Base
Visit to Japan Coast Guard, Yokohama Maritime Disaster Prevention Base

Photo taken at Honda Motor Company, Ltd. (Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)
Visit to Honda Motor Company, Ltd.
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

Photo taken at Miraikan, The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)
Visit to Miraikan, The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

Photo taken at Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum, Kyoto (Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)
Visit to Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum, Kyoto
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Nijo Castle (Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)
Visit to Nijo Castle
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto 1 (Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)
Visit to Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

Photo taken at Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto 2 (Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)
Visit to Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

Photo taken at Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto 3 (Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)
Visit to Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

Photo of Debriefing Session (Lecture by Dr. Masashi Nishihara,President of the Research Institute for Peace and Security)
Debriefing Session
(Lecture by Dr. Masashi Nishihara,President of the Research Institute for Peace and Security)

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan is clearly a world class country with a fantastic history, culture and economy. I enjoyed learning about all three during my stay here. The visit to Kyoto was very helpful to my appreciation of Japan’s history, and I liked watching the countryside from the train windows. It was also good to have the opportunity to speak with so many governmental leaders about Japan’s current situation and international relations. Many issues were unknown to me before attending the briefings and discussions.
  • I am very impressed with Japan’s infrastructure and its ability to execute large scale public projects. These types of endeavors require coordination between a huge number of entities - it’s impressive. The same ability to find shared purpose was demonstrated after the 3.11 earthquakes. Other countries and organizations have quite a bit to learn from Japan.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • It was my first time visiting Japan, so I was able to gain a “ground perspective” that was very valuable. In particular, what stood out to me was Japan’s limitless potential for economic growth (esp. in technology) and its precautious security situation.
  • I knew a bit about Japan’s history and culture, but this trip allowed me to learn more about its economy, its defense sector, and the challenges the country faces in the future. I also learned more about U.S.-Japan relationship.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • Japanese history from the late 1800’s onwards. I remain less knowledgeable about the history between 1850-World War II and believe it will help my understanding of the post-war politics
  • Economy and how Japan will rebound from the “Lost 2 decades”, demographics and how will Japan combat an aging population and low birth rate.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Being a policy writer in the U.S., I hope to use my knowledge gained to bring an understanding in how to posture and implement the US’s strategy of a “rebalance to Asia”, and the role and importance that Japan plays in the international community.
  • I will seek to engage colleagues and friends on pertinent areas for cooperation and shared interests, and I will share my experiences and observations widely.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I love Japan, and I wish to return as often as possible for the rest of my life! I would jump at the opportunity to live and work in Tokyo for several years. The KAKEHASHI Project has played an important part in reacquainting me with Japan’s charms!
  • First, thank you very much. The meetings with government officials were very valuable, as was the discussion with Honda Motor Company, Ltd. I was very impressed by the Japanese Self Defense Force’s capabilities and the discussions of their training from the U.S. military. I also gained a better understanding of Japan’s economic strengths and real challenges. I am interested in engaging with Japanese technology developers to identify market opportunities in the U.S.  Again though, thank you very much.

[Contact Us]

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FAX: +81-(0)3-5369-6042
E-mail: infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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