"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Heritage Foundation

Invitation in February 2014

Short-term stay in Japan: U.S. Young Researchers Invitation
Group 3
Heritage Foundation

Period: February 10 – 20, 2014
Local Visit Destination: Kyoto Prefecture
Number of Participants: 10

Tour Photo Album

Group photo at Orientation
Orientation

Photo taken at Tokyo National Museum
Visit to Tokyo National Museum
(Studying Japanese history and culture)

Photo taken at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Visit to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Photo with  former members of The Matsushita Institute of Government and Management
Visit to former members of The Matsushita Institute of Government and Management

Photo with a Diet member, Katsuyuki Kawai
Visit to a Diet member
(Mr. Katsuyuki Kawai)

Photo with a Diet member, Ichiro Aizawa
Visit to a Diet member
(Mr. Ichiro Aizawa)

Photo taken at The Japan Institute of International Affairs
Visit to The Japan Institute of International Affairs

Photo with Japanese journalists
Networking with Japanese journalists

Photo taken at Shimadzu Foundation Memorial Hall, Shimadzu Corporation
Visit to Shimadzu Foundation Memorial Hall, Shimadzu Corporation
(Learning about Japanese companies)

Photo taken at Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
Visit to Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

Photo taken at Shourinji Temple
Visit to Shourinji Temple
(Zen meditation experience)

Photo taken at Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum
Visit to Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum
(Learning about Japanese local industries)

Photo taken at Fukujuen Tea Company
Visit to Fukujuen Tea Company
(Japanese tea ceremony experience)

Photo taken in Uji
Visit to Uji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Kinkaku-ji
Visit to Kinkaku-ji Temple
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Nijo Castle
Visit to Nijo Castle
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Heian Jingu
Visit to Heian Jingu Shrine
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Kiyomizu-dera
Visit to Kiyomizu-dera
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

Photo taken at Japan International Cooperation Agency
Independent research
(Visit to Japan International Cooperation Agency)

Photo taken at The Tokyo Foundation
Independent research
(Visit to The Tokyo Foundation)

Photo taken at the Ministry of Defense
Visit to the Ministry of Defense

Photo taken at The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
Visit to Miraikan, The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

Photo of Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • The Japanese culture is extremely important to the residents of Japan. The people are very professional, courteous and have great respect for other cultures and people. They have an eagerness to learn from others and a willingness to engage in interesting and productive discussions.
  • One of Japan's greatest strengths is the character of the Japanese people. The respect and hospitality shown was most impressive. The culture is deep and varied. Moving into the future, Japan's strength will be technology, cultural exports, and being a stable hub for investment in a volatile region.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • When I thought of Japan previously, it associated the country with innovation and progress i.e., Sony and Toyota. But, this trip allowed me to better understand traditional Japanese culture and history beyond past 30 years. I appreciate the blend of old and new.
  • I understand Japan's government better. I also understand some of the historical context of Japan's policy motivations. The Japanese culture is often portrayed as strange in America but my experience made me realize that cultural differences occur due to historical, geographical, and economic reasons.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I would like to learn more about Japanese cities and Japanese MNCs (multinationals) working globally. I am very interested in learning more about youth culture in Japan and would like to visit Osaka.
  • I would like to learn more about the cultural differences of different Japanese regions. I would also like to learn more about Shinto and Japanese Buddhism.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • In my studies of Korea, I hope to understand better and comprehend the future of Korea-Japan relations. At an upcoming young researchers meeting, I hope to share about the positive experience I had traveling with the KAKEHASHI Project.
  • I will tell family, friends and co-workers about my experience with Japan's culture and policies. I will also follow Japan's efforts on cybersecurity and continue a dialogue with the experts I have met through this program.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I am very grateful for the opportunity to visit Japan, meet Japanese experts and experience first-hand Japanese culture. Thank you very much for your hard work on the project. My stay in Japan was a great experience.
  • I greatly appreciate the opportunity to visit Japan and learn about the culture, history, and realities of modern Japan. I would have liked to have had more free time to explore Tokyo and Kyoto on my own, and I think a trip in the spring or summer may have made the trip more enjoyable. I do want to return to visit southern Japan as a vacation. Overall, a very positive experience.

[Contact Us]

TEL: +81-(0)3-5369-6022
FAX: +81-(0)3-5369-6042
E-mail: infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
(When sending e-mail, please enter a half-width character "@" instead of a full-width character "@.")

Page Top