"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Mills High School (California)

Invitation in July 2014

High School Students Group 5
Mills High School (California)

Period:July 8 - 17
Local Visit Destination:Tsubame City, Niigata Prefecture
Number of Participants:25

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo of Senso-ji (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Senso-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Tokyo National Museum (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
Tokyo National Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School 1
School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School

Photo of School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School 2
School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School

Photo of School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School 3
School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute Igusa High School

Photo of Courtesy call at Tokyo Metropolitan Government 1
Courtesy call at Tokyo Metropolitan Government

Photo of Courtesy call at Tokyo Metropolitan Government 2
Courtesy call at Tokyo Metropolitan Government

Photo of Homestay
Homestay

Photo of School exchange at Niigata Prefectural Tsubame Secondary School 1
School exchange at Niigata Prefectural Tsubame Secondary School

Photo of School exchange at Niigata Prefectural Tsubame Secondary School 2
School exchange at Niigata Prefectural Tsubame Secondary School

Photo of Tsubame Industrial Materials Museum (Learning about Japanese local industry) 1
Tsubame Industrial Materials Museum
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Tsubame Industrial Materials Museum (Learning about Japanese local industry) 2
Tsubame Industrial Materials Museum
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Tsubame Migakiya Ichibankan (Learning about Japanese local industry) 1
Tsubame Migakiya Ichibankan
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Tsubame Migakiya Ichibankan (Learning about Japanese local industry) 2
Tsubame Migakiya Ichibankan
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Gyokusendo (Learning about Japanese local industry) 1
Gyokusendo
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Gyokusendo (Learning about Japanese local industry) 2
Gyokusendo
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Yahiko-jinja (Learning about Japanese traditional culture) 1
Yahiko-jinja
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Yahiko-jinja (Learning about Japanese traditional culture) 2
Yahiko-jinja
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)
National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)

Photo of Harajuku (Learning about Cool Japan)
Harajuku
(Learning about Cool Japan)

Photo of Debriefing session 1
Debriefing session

Photo of Debriefing session 2
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1. Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • One of Japan's major strengths is their work ethics. They work very hard at what they do no matter the working conditions. Because of this Japanese products are attractive to foreigners and atmosphere is very welcoming. I noticed the people here show hospitality and take pride in what they do. Japan's balance between tradition and modern life is very attractive to outsiders.
  • I believe that Japan's strengths are citizens' open-mindedness as well as their ability to cooperate with each other and work together as a team. Not only that, but the morals and expectations of the Japanese people are so high that people hardly ever need to worry about leaving valuable in a hotel room, dinner table, etc. The Japanese people have an incredible honor code.

2. How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • There is a conception that the Japanese are quiet, boring, etc., but I believe this stereotype is extremely wrong. While Japanese people tend to be well-mannered and polite, they have also proven to be fun-loving and exciting. Everyone I have spoken to on this trip has been both kind and funny.
  • I came to Japan expecting a very strict society where people are quiet and calm at all times but was pleasantly surprised to find that they are much more affectionate than media portrays them to be. I was also surprised by the efforts they do to preserve the environment as well as their history and culture.

3. After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I wanted to learn more about Japan's culture. As a country developing, new life style and technology would slowly substitute its traditional behavior. Japan is one of the few countries that put effort in progressing while maintaining traditions. Learning more traditional cultures can lead to a deeper understanding of this language and culture.
  • I want to learn more about the life style of a Japanese (preferably, high school) student. I would be interested to understand their extracurricular activities more. According to my Tokyo host student, some people do not get home until 8:00pm. In Millbrae, I do not think extracurricular activities are as popular or enforced. The activities make school fun, so I am curious to know how Japan is able to get their students so involved.

4. It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I want to tell everyone I know at home what I have learned in Japan. For a long time, I have wondered what I will do for a job in the future. Now I am thinking of a career (if possible) and studying abroad in Japan. I think if there is an opportunity, I will definitely go for it. I would like to inform other people and maybe they will want to join as well. After all, we are all still human living on Earth.
  • I will teach people how Japanese people really are, or how American people are; because after my experience in homestay, I found out Japanese people have a weird perspective on people of the U.S. and my friends back in the U.S. think of Japanese people as strange.

5. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • My experience in Japan will be cherished forever. From the bus trips around the city to the adventures in underground Tokyo; every aspect of this trip was worthwhile. Every single day was an adventure. I will never forget the memories I created in this country.
  • I was very amazed by the "togetherness" of the two host families I had stayed with. In the U.S., due to the parents' jobs, families rarely eat meals and spend time together. At my host family homes, we did everything together as a family and I think that is a wonderful and priceless experience.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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