"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Spring Valley High School (Nevada)

Invitation in July 2014

High School Students Group 5
Spring Valley High School (Nevada)

Period:July 8 - 17
Local Visit Destination:Hakuba Village, Nagano Prefecture
Number of Participants:26

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo of Senso-ji (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Senso-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of National Museum of Tokyo (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
National Museum of Tokyo
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of Zenko-ji (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Zenko-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Matsumoto Castle (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Matsumoto Castle
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Ishiimiso (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Ishiimiso
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of The Salt Road Chojiya (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
The Salt Road Chojiya
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of Meeting with host family
Meeting with host family

Photo of Rice cake making (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Rice cake making
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Hakuba Ski Jumping Stadium
Hakuba Ski Jumping Stadium

Photo of School exchange at Hakuba High School
School exchange at Hakuba High School

Photo of Zen meditation experience (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Zen meditation experience
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Farewell party with host family
Farewell party with host family

Photo of Imperial Palace
Imperial Palace

Photo of School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Suginami Sogo High School
School exchange at Tokyo Metropolitan Suginami Sogo High School

Photo of National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)
National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)

Photo of Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1. Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I think Japan's strengths are politeness, respect, and cleanliness. Japan's attractiveness is the scenery and nature. Japan has a lot of trees and it is very green, compared to my home, and I enjoyed seeing the countryside of Japan where there are many plants.
  • I think that Japan's strengths are the people's respectfulness and trustworthiness. I had forgotten an expensive thing on one of the busses in Nagano and it was returned the next morning. This is a good thing to tell about because it makes people less intimidated by those who are unknown to them. The attractiveness comes from the beautiful landscape away from the big cities. Before I travelled to Hakuba Village, I had never seen so much green before.

2. How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • Before I went on this trip, I thought that Japan was considered a bad country because of what happened during the World War II. But when I came here, I learned that Japan and the U.S. are now one of the closest alliances. Along the way, I figured out that Japan is not a bad country at all and the KAKEHASHI Project made me realize that.
  • My perspective of Japan changed through this project because I got to see how differently things are than how I imagined them to be. Before I came I thought that Tokyo would be very dirty and a lot of pollution but it was the total opposite. It was very clean even though I did see some trash in some parts of Tokyo, but the majority of the time it was very clean. I also thought that people here ate fish all the time, but I was wrong. While I was here I ate quite a lot of chicken which was very good. This is how my perspective of Japan changed throughout this project.

3. After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • It pretty sure is about its history, "Edo Jidai", when there were a lot of samurai. I want to know more about Katsura, Takasugi, Sakamoto,etc. Samurai, I really like to know about them because there are many stories and information I can learn from.
  • Religion, how culture of fashion originated from, different types of food, why they are so clean.

4. It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I hope to go to MIT university when I graduate high school, but if I can study overseas, I would absolutely study in Japan. Not just because I have a common knowledge in how Japanese class is, but also because Japan will definitely feel like a home to me when I come back.
  • I will share stories of my experience with the people of Japan and pass on what I learned from my tour guide, host family, and the place I visited like the museums and temples. In this way, I hope to open the eyes of my peers and get them interested in Japanese history and culture.

5. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • Having the opportunity to visit Japan has been the greatest experience of my life. I got to see new places, take a lot of pictures and make many new friends. One of my favorite experiences was being able to meet and interact with Japanese students who are the same age as I am. This experience has motivated me to continue to study the Japanese language and further my understanding of Japanese culture.
  • At first I was very nervous about this project and going overseas without my parents but these ten days are days I will remember forever. Going to the high schools was great way to learn and experience Japanese culture and life. Staying with my host family are memories to never forget. My host father was very kind and it was very difficult to say our goodbye.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
(When sending e-mail, please enter a half-width character "@" instead of a full-width character "@.")

Page Top