"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation:University of Cincinnati (OH)

Invitation in June 2014

University of Cincinnati (OH)

Period:June 9 - 19
Local Visit Destination:Gifu
Number of Participants:13

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation 1
Orientation
(Lecture demonstration of Japanese music by Mr. Sho Asano, Tsugaru-Jamisen player)

Photo of Orientation 2
Orientation
(Lecture on Japanese language)

Photo taken at Tokyo National Museum
Tokyo National Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo taken in Asakusa
Asakusa
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of School exchange at Tama Art University
School exchange at Tama Art University

Group photo taken at Tama Art University
School exchange at Tama Art University

Photo taken at KORG Inc.
Company visit to KORG Inc.

Photo taken at the National Theatre of Japan
Kabuki performance at the National Theatre of Japan
(Learning about Japanese culture)

Photo taken at a station waiting for a bullet train
Trip to Gifu by bullet train

Photo of Makuwa Japanese puppet experience
Makuwa Japanese puppet experience
(Learning about Japanese local culture)

Photo taken at Gifu Shouhouji
Gifu Shouhouji Daibutsu (Great Buddha)
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Mino Washi Akari art gallery
Mino Washi “Akari” art gallery
(Learning about Japanese local culture)

Photo of Traditional Japanese papermaking experience at Mino Washi Japanese Traditional Paper Museum
Traditional Japanese papermaking experience at Mino Washi Japanese Traditional Paper Museum
(Learning about Japanese local culture)

Photo taken on Udatsu Street
The streets of Udatsu
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Former Imai family residence
Former Imai family residence
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Banshouji
Banshouji Temple
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken in Osu Shopping District
Osu Shopping District
(Learning about local area)

Group photo taken at Nagoya City University 1
School exchange at Nagoya City University

Group photo taken at Nagoya City University 2
School exchange at Nagoya City University

Group photo taken at Tokyo Station
Tokyo Station
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo taken at Japan Institute of Design Promotion
Japan Institute of Design Promotion

Photo taken at The National Museum of Modern Art
The National Museum of Modern Art
(Learning about Japanese culture)

Photo taken in Harajuku/Omotesando
Harajuku/Omotesando
(Learning about Cool Japan)

Photo taken at Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan has many great strength. The people are the main strength. I feel that if people weren’t so calm, polite, caring and welcoming, the experience would not be the same.
  • I believe that Japan’s strength and attractiveness lies in its strongly ingrained work ethic, pairs with their value of cohesiveness and understanding. The ability to instill these basic beliefs along with general respect and patience from childhood to adulthood is one of Japan’s greatest strength.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • While I did not expect Japan to be a cold place, I figured that many people would keep to themselves and not be concerned with the matter of theirs. Upon interacting with various people, I found that the Japanese strive to be courteous, regardless of what they may gain from doing so. I now see Japan as a more selfless place.
  • Previously to the KAKEHASHI Project, I had two split ideas of Japan—old Japan (Emperors, Samurai, Kabuki...) and new Japan (Anime, Harajuku, Manga...). What I discovered is that Japan is not split in half, but rather that the values that exist on the island do not have age restrictions (old people like anime too!).

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • The language barrier is the one thing that makes being in Japan challenging. I would like to become more fluent in Japanese. Japanese craft is perfect and I would love to learn more about their process of making things both traditionally and modern.
  • I would love to learn more about Japanese craftsmanship, art, history and Japanese craft. I have noticed it turns the mundane into something extremely beautiful, for examples, a simple tea mug is beautifully handcrafted piece of art/design. History is also something I want to look further into because unlike American history, so much is embedded into everyday life and activities.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I believe the best way to understand something is to experience it firsthand. Therefore, I plan on returning to Japan as soon as possible! Our professor lived in Japan for years and his evident passion for and knowledge of the country not only enhanced my experience while here, but also got me even more excited before the trip than I would have been otherwise. One day I hope I can spread passion for Japan (or everything else) the way our professor spread it to me.
  • Ultimately I hope to study design in Japan, possibly at Tama Art University. Until then I hope to build a better understanding of Japan by communicating with the Japanese students I met here.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I really enjoyed this experience in Japan. We got to learn so much more about the language and life, mingling and surrounding ourselves in the environment rather than sitting in the classroom with textbooks in hand. Through KAKEHASHI Project we got to visit many places locals don’t even have the chance to visit. The food provided also integrated us into the lives of the Japanese. Seeing and tasting what they eat and how they eat.
  • The KAKEHASHI Project experience was surreal in the regards of how many different parts of the Japanese culture we experienced in only 10 days. From the traditions of Mino city to the innovative design at Tama Art University, we were given that insight from the help of the program. Our professor helped us integrate very well to local culture. To our professor and the program I am eternally grateful.

[Contact Us]

TEL: +81-(0)3-5369-6022
FAX: +81-(0)3-5369-6042
E-mail: infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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