"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Loyola Marymount University (California)

Invitation in June 2014

TOMODACHI INOUYE SCHOLARS as a part of KAKEHASHI Project Invitation Program Group 2
Loyola Marymount University (California)

Period:June 23 - July 3
Local Visit Destination:Hiroshima
Number of Participants:25

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo taken at Tokyo National Museum
Tokyo National Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo taken at Senso-ji
Senso-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo taken at Meeting with Keisuke Suzuki, Member of the House of Representatives
Meeting with Keisuke Suzuki, Member of the House of Representatives

Photo taken at National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)

Photo of School exchange at Sophia University
School exchange at Sophia University

Photo taken at Hiroshima Castle
Hiroshima Castle
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Hiroshima City Hall
Courtesy call at Hiroshima City Hall

Photo taken at Museum of Japanese Immigration to Hawaii
Museum of Japanese Immigration to Hawaii
(Deepening knowledge about Senator Daniel Inouye)

Photo taken at Fudenosato Kobo
Fudenosato Kobo
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Miyajimabori coloring experience
Miyajimabori coloring experience
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima
Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo taken at Story telling by atomic bomb survivor
Story telling by atomic bomb survivor
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of School exchange at Yasuda Women's University
School exchange at Yasuda Women's University

Photo taken at TOYOTA Tokyo H.Q
TOYOTA Tokyo H.Q.
(Learning about Japanese industry)

Photo taken at Lecture of Ichiro Fujisaki, Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States
Lecture of Ichiro Fujisaki, Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States

Photo taken at Discussion with TOMODACHI alumni
Discussion with TOMODACHI alumni

Photo taken at Panel discussion with USJC members
Panel discussion with USJC members

Photo taken in Harajuku
Harajuku
(Learning about "Cool Japan")

Photo of Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I believe that above all, Japan strengths and attractiveness are rooted in their culture. I was astonished by the advanced technological architecture and environmental sophistication of the country. One example is the sense of responsibility over one's waste. This cultural value has formed the modern environmental cleanliness of Japan that I deeply appreciated.
  • Having participated in the KAKEHASHI project what I think some strengths that Japan possesses are sense of community, unity and care for the cleanliness of their community.

2.How did you change your perspective of Japan through this project?

  • Prior to coming to Japan, I knew little about the country other than the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor during WWⅡ, the U.S. dropped two atomic bombs on the country, and the 3/11 Great East Asia Earthquake. Now I understand so much more about Japanese culture, custom, its people, its government and most importantly, the value and necessity of Japanese – U.S. ties. Japan is vital to the success of the world and the betterment of the future.
  • Japan and its people changed for me throughout this project. When I first arrived, I felt out of place as a Japanese American. I felt there was a certain expectation for me to understand the language, culture, and the people. As I stayed longer and communicated with more Japanese people, I found that was not the case. There was no expectation. Many of the people just wanted to communicate and understand. I also finally had the opportunity to contact with my culture and understand myself better.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I would like to learn more about the NGO and NPO in Japan to be able to extend social justice cases.
  • I want to learn about business in Japan that units with U.S. business to maybe seek at internship opportunities in Japan.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I think education the LMU campus in Japan as a whole is necessary. Maybe focusing on things such as Harajuku and modern Japan to get people interested that we can teach the campus about how important U.S.-Japanese relationship is to the future of the world.
  • Sharing my experience is the way that I can promote this relationship. Just like the A-bomb survivor said, 'In sharing my story, you make a difference. 'To further this, I plan to work with my fellow TOMODACHI scholars to hold seminars on campus to advocate for this relationship. Another thing I plan to do is go back to my job and exercise my leadership skills and advocating team to help/sponsor this wonderful program.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I felt it helped make me certain that I want to become as international leader in work internationally. The best part of the experience was meeting the Hiroshima survivor. The opportunity you gave me I will forever feel blessed with.
  • The project has broadened my world views and has helped me understand Japanese culture on a much deeper level than the one that people generally get out of textbooks and it was highly enjoyable. An incredible experience to say the least.

[Contact Us]

TEL: +81-(0)3-5369-6022
FAX: +81-(0)3-5369-6042
E-mail: infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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