"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: University of Hawaii at Manoa(Hawaii)

Invitation in July 2014

TOMODACHI INOUYE SCHOLARS as a part of KAKEHASHI Project Invitation Program Group 3
University of Hawaii at Manoa (Hawaii)

Period:July 28 - August 7
Local Visit Destination:Ehime
Number of Participants:25

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo of Tokyo National Museum (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
Tokyo National Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of Senso-ji (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Senso-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Courtesy call on Governor of Ehime Prefecture
Courtesy call on Governor of Ehime Prefecture

Photo of School exchange at Matsuyama University 1
School exchange at Matsuyama University

Photo of School exchange at Matsuyama University 2
School exchange at Matsuyama University

Photo of Cycling on Shimanami Kaido
Cycling on Shimanami Kaido

Photo of Oyamazumi Shrine
Oyamazumi Shrine

Photo of Uchiko-za Kabuki Theater (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Uchiko-za Kabuki Theater
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Matsuyama Castle (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Matsuyama Castle
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Shiki Museum (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
Shiki Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of Ehime Beverage Inc. (Learning about Japanese local industry)
Ehime Beverage Inc.
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

Photo of Panel discussion with Japanese American Female Leaders
Panel discussion with Japanese American Female Leaders

Photo of Hitachi Collaboration Square Kyobashi (Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)
Hitachi Collaboration Square Kyobashi
(Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)

Photo of Discussion with TOMODACHI Alumni coordinators
Discussion with TOMODACHI Alumni coordinators

Photo of The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)
The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about Japanese cutting-edge technology)

Photo of NHK Studio Park
NHK Studio Park

Photo of Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1. Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Adaptions to changes. Japan is very uniqe in taking inventions, ideas and technology, adding their own to it to improve and fit their lives. From the simple toilet to foods and other types of technology, it all feels Japanese.
  • I think that Japan does really well with taking care of their environment. They are very clean, eco-friendly and respectful of others in this aspect. I also think that people here are polite, wonderful and very welcoming. Japan also is organized and efficient in all aspects.

2. How did you change your perspective of Japan through this project?

  • I always knew that Japan was really innovative but I did not realize how advanced their technology really is. Today we visited the science museum and they had life-like robots and operational androids that completely blew my mind.
  • I am much more open to Japanese culture as prior to this trip. It was hard to me to connect as I am a fourth-generation Japanese-American,, but I have found a big interest in the Japanese culture I have learned about on the trip.

3. After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • After I return to the U.S., I would like to learn more about how the people of Tohoku and Fukushima are doing, particularly those who have moved to the U. S. as a result of the disaster and the aftermath. At the U.S. Embassy, we had a chance to hear from the 21st generation brewer of the Tomisawa Sake brewery. They had their factory 3.5 km away from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Their home and brewery were in the evacuation zones, so they had to move their production to the U. S. It will be interesting to see how they do in the future and what their impact will be on the U.S. people.
  • I want to learn more about working in Japan, and their attitude towards westerners and female workers. After listening to the stories and advice of other female workers in Japan, it became a topic of interest. In the U.S., the dynamics of the workplace are different and it is interesting to compare and contrast the two.

4. It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Ideally I would encourage people to travel and just really experience the diverse culture of Japan. It really comes down to people to people relations and it is needed to better understand one another as an entirety. Also I would share what I was educated about in Japan and help people understand the true situations Japan is facing as of today and what had happened in the past.
  • I believe that it is important to learn about U.S.-Japan relations not only politically, but economically as well. Learning about what needs to be improved between the U.S. and Japan is vital if we want to make positive changes in the future. Understanding perspectives from both sides helps one come to broader understanding of the current situation between the two nations. With this knowledge, cultural misunderstandings and faux pas should occur less often, leading to less emotional strains between Japan and the U.S.

5. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • My experience here was absolutely wonderful and better than I had ever hoped for. I think I most enjoyed our time in Matsuyama. Going to the Doyo Yoichi(Saturday night market) with our host university was so fulfilling because I not only got to make many wonderful new friends, but I also got to experience what living in Japan is like from the perspective of someone just like us. The people to people relationships I made during this journey could never be compared to a friend I could have made by communicating using technology. This, my first trip to Japan, is truly a once in a lifetime experience because of this people I have met and those who I will forever be able to call my friends. Thank you so much for this opportunity!
  • I had such a great experience on this trip. I became friends with everyone on this trip and it seemed like we all became a tight group. I have visited Japan before but I have never experienced Japan like this trip. It is one thing to visit shops, museums, or temples but to learn about the culture through local people, it brings understanding to another level.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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