"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: University of Massachusetts, Boston (Massachusetts)

Invitation in July 2014

TOMODACHI INOUYE SCHOLARS as a part of KAKEHASHI Project Invitation Program Group 3
University of Massachusetts, Boston (Massachusetts)

Period:July 28 - August 7
Local Visit Destination:Hiroshima
Number of Participants:25

Tour Photo Album

Photo of Orientation
Orientation

Photo of Tokyo National Museum (Learning about Japanese history and culture)
Tokyo National Museum
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

Photo of Senso-ji (Learning about Japanese traditional culture)
Senso-ji
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture)

Photo of Shukkeien (Learning about Japanese local history and traditional culture)
Shukkeien
(Learning about Japanese local history and traditional culture)

Photo of Courtesy call on Chairman of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation
Courtesy call on Chairman of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation

Photo of Testimony from A-Bomb survivor (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Testimony from A-Bomb survivor
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Saijo sake breweries
Saijo sake breweries

Photo of School exchange at Hiroshima University (Japanese class)
School exchange at Hiroshima University
(Japanese class)

Photo of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Itsukushima Shrine (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Itsukushima Shrine
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Miyajima-bori decorating experience (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Miyajima-bori decorating experience
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Hiroshima Castle (Learning about Japanese local history and culture)
Hiroshima Castle
(Learning about Japanese local history and culture)

Photo of Nihojima-mura Museum of Japanese Immigrants to Hawaii (Deepening knowledge about Senator Inouye)
Nihojima-mura Museum of Japanese Immigrants to Hawaii
(Deepening knowledge about Senator Inouye)

Photo of Mazda Museum (Learning about Japanese industry)
Mazda Museum
(Learning about Japanese industry)

Photo of School exchange at Showa Women's University
School exchange at Showa Women's University

Photo of National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Learning about Japanese cutting-Edge technology)
National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about Japanese cutting-Edge technology)

Photo of Discussion with TOMODACHI Alumni coordinators
Discussion with TOMODACHI Alumni coordinators

Photo of Debriefing session
Debriefing session

Voices from Participants

1. Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan’s greatest strengths revolve around their great sense of community. Because community is so strong in Japan, good principles are easily embedded in its people. That is why the principle of peace is so well abided by in Japan.
  • Japan’s strengths are that they are able to move past the grief and sorrow they experience and utilizing what they lack to contribute even a greater and faster technology and economic pace to attract more people to understand Japan’s beauty.

2. How did you change your perspective of Japan through this project?

  • I definitely felt separate from the people of Japan before my first trip. However experiencing Japan first-hand has shown me that we are not so dissimilar, the Japanese and Americans. Culturally we are remarkably more similar than I thought. Being here was comparatively easy.
  • My perspective of Japan has changed by realizing how much it strives to promote peace across the world. With encouragement from the U.S. it is becoming more assertive on the world stage.

3. After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I would love to learn more about how the U.S. foster a healthy relationship with Japan in modern times, and how we engage in cultural exchanges between the two countries.
  • I would love to learn more about the Japanese language, economics impacts as a result of demographics, and future programs to help bridge cultural differences hosted by the U.S. and Japanese government.

4. It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I would like to get involved in discussions about the U.S-Japan relationship, as well as hopefully building connections with students from Japan. In addition, I will talk to members of my community about the things I learned during my trip.
  • First I will make sure I keep in touch with the connections that I have gain on this trip. And I will also share my experiences and what I have learnt with my peers and the people that did not get chance to travel to Japan.

5. Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I cannot begin to articulate the gratitude I feel for being able to participate in such a life-changing experience. I am aware that the KAKEHASHI Project does not end here. I am quite eager to return to the U.S. and continue to explore the multifaceted relationship between the U.S. and Japan.
  • I learned and experienced so much more than I thought I would. Going to Hiroshima was especially a moving experience and imperative to our understanding of the Japan-U.S. relationship. Most of all, I was moved by the Japanese capacity to love, especially after so much painful history with U.S.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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