"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Georgetown University / Professor Alexander

Invitation in May 2014

Short-term stay in Japan: U.S. Young Researchers Invitation
Group 6
Georgetown University / Professor Alexander

Period: May 19 – 29, 2014
Local Visit Destination: Hiroshima Pref.
Number of Participants: 10

Tour Photo Album

photo of Orientation
Orientation

photo of Senso-ji Temple
Senso-ji Temple
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

photo of Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA)

photo of Discussion with MOFA staff
Discussion with MOFA staff

photo of Tokyo National Museum
Tokyo National Museum
(Studying Japanese history and culture)

photo of Akihabara
Akihabara
(Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)

photo of Hiroshima Municipal Office
Hiroshima Municipal Office

photo of Hiroshima Peace Institute, Hiroshima City University
Hiroshima Peace Institute, Hiroshima City University
(Understanding peace-building)

photo of Chugoku Jozo Co, Ltd.
Chugoku Jozo Co, Ltd.
(Learning about Japanese local industry)

photo of Itsukushima Shrine
Itsukushima Shrine
(Learning about Japanese local culture and history)

photo of Miyajima-bori carving experience
Miyajima-bori carving experience
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

photo of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
(Understanding peace-building)

photo of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
(Understanding peace-building)

photo of Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization
Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization

photo of Research Institute of Economy, Trade & Industry, IAA
Research Institute of Economy, Trade & Industry, IAA

photo of University exchange at Keio University
University exchange at Keio University

photo of University exchange at Keio University
University exchange at Keio University

photo of JPMorgan Securities Japan Co., Ltd.
JPMorgan Securities Japan Co., Ltd.
(Independent research)

photo of The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

photo of Tokyo Stock Exchange
Tokyo Stock Exchange

photo of Debriefing Session
Debriefing Session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan’s strengths/attractiveness lies in its efficiency (transportation, recycling, electricity usage etc.) and the quality of its human capital (polite, educated, and hardworking). I think the strong emphasis on quality service could be a major selling point in any tourism campaign. Additionally, Japan has many beautiful historical sights and diverse neighborhood/urban areas.
  • I believe Japan’s strength lies in its overall level of development. As said by one of the speakers, Japan developed very rapidly, and despite the “lost two decades” still ranks in my mind, in the top tier of countries. I especially appreciate the well-developed infrastructure and efficiency of the country.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • Our exposure to a variety of economics, social, and cultural experiences made me understand Japan on a much deeper level.
  • When I came to Japan seven years ago I was very interested in learning about Japan’s culture, and while that was still true, on this trip I gained greater understanding of the issues facing Japan in the economic and political spheres. This has given me a more complete picture of the complexities that Japan faces and helps to explain its behaviors on the international stage.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • I hope to expand my understanding of Japan's role in the regional security architecture and to incorporate Japan into my personal area of focus of cross-strait relations. The KAKEHASHI has shown me that Japan plays a much larger role in the region than I had previously thought. The trip to Hiroshima has also enhanced my appreciation for Japanese art and culture.
  • Everything. I was fascinated with Japan before the trip and even more so now. I have studied the economy in detail and would like to continue to learn about it and its progress. I would like to peruse the history more to understand today's culture and perspective.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I am an Asian Studies graduate student at Georgetown University and I have mainly focused on China, but since this trip I plan to diversify my area studies to include more U.S.-Japan relations.
  • I plan on talking to my friends and family about what I learned on this trip, especially when compared to my last trip to Japan. Also, I plan on writing a few articles about what I learned from all the experts who spoke to us so more people can learn about Japan’s political motivations even if they were not on this trip to hear it firsthand.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • It was really great opportunity to be able to meet with so many people and learn about many different aspects of Japanese society. The schedule was very full.
  • I learned a lot on the KAKEHASHI project related to the economic and policy concerns of Japan. Visiting Hiroshima and different places in Tokyo were both very fun.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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