"KAKEHASHI Project" Invitation: Georgetown University / Professor Cha

Invitation in May 2014

Short-term stay in Japan: U.S. Young Researchers Invitation
Group 6
Georgetown University / Professor Cha

Period: May 19 – 29, 2014
Local Visit Destination: Kyoto Pref.
Number of Participants: 13

Tour Photo Album

photo of Orientation
Orientation

photo of Senso-ji Temple
Senso-ji Temple
(Learning about Japanese history and culture)

photo of Ministry of Foreign Affairs(MOFA)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs(MOFA)

photo of Discussion with MOFA staff
Discussion with MOFA staff

photo of Visiting a Diet member Mr. Seiji Maehara
Visiting a Diet member
Mr. Seiji Maehara

photo of Tokyo National Museum
Tokyo National Museum
(Studying Japanese history and culture)

photo of Akihabara
Akihabara
(Learning about ‘Cool Japan’)

photo of University exchange at Ritsumeikan University
University exchange at Ritsumeikan University

photo of Discussion with the students of Master Course at Ritsumeikan University
Discussion with the students of Master Course at Ritsumeikan University

photo of Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum
Gekkeikan Okura Sake Museum
(Learning about Japanese local industries)

photo of Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine
Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

photo of Kiyomizu-dera Temple
Kiyomizu-dera Temple
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

photo of Shourin-ji Temple
Shourin-ji Temple
(Zen Meditation Experience)

photo of Gion
Gion
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

photo of Kinkaku-ji Temple
Kinkaku-ji Temple
(Learning about Japanese traditional culture and history)

photo of Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
Kodai Yuzen-en, Kyoto
(Experiencing Japanese local traditional craftsmanship)

photo of Koko-an Tea Room
Koko-an Tea Room
(Experience of Tea Ceremony)

photo of Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization
Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization

photo of National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

photo of The Tokyo Foundation
The Tokyo Foundation

photo of KEIDANREN (Japan Business Federation) (Independent research)
KEIDANREN (Japan Business Federation)
(Independent research)

photo of The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
(Learning about cutting-edge technologies of Japan)

photo of Tokyo Stock Exchange
Tokyo Stock Exchange

photo of Debriefing Session
Debriefing Session

Voices from Participants

1.Having participated in the KAKEHASHI Project, what do you think are Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • Japan is the most important U.S.ally in Asia. It has good governance, low crime, little corruption and progressive valves. Japan is a leader in science and technology. Japanese people have excellent manners and carry themselves very well. People in the U.S. would do well to learn from them in these respects.
  • Culture and Civility. Japan has extremely high standards for how society is to operate. This breeds respect among the population for each other and for the nation.
    This seems to foster an idea of people working for the good of each other, rather than selfishness. Japan is one of the cleanest countries I have visited and continuously takes care of itself.

2.How do you change your perspective of Japan through the project?

  • I tried to keep an open mind on Japan. The interaction with Japanese students and academics are particularly helpful. I also enjoyed doing the independent research.
  • Westerners often look at Japan as monolithic and homogenous, but people here actually hold a very wide range of beliefs.

3.After returning to the U.S., what aspect(s) of Japan do you want to learn more?

  • Japan's modern culture and traditional religion are both very intriguing, and I hope to further explore both through reading and future visits. From a professional standpoint, I will further examine Japan’s ODA and investment policies in Southeast Asia.
  • I would like to learn the future of Japan's Energy and track the options for energy mix.

4.It is hoped that you will promote further mutual understanding between our two countries, serving as bridges in the Japan-U.S. relationship. What will you do to deepen understanding of Japan’s strengths and attractiveness?

  • I will be working toward securing a job in the U.S. government when I will promote the U.S.-Japan alliance and to learn from my Japanese counterpart.
  • I will take a class on Japanese history at Georgetown. Additionally, I will attend cultural events at the Japanese Embassy. One day, if I can afford it, I would like to bring my mother to Japan. I think she would really like it.

5.Please freely describe your experience in the KAKEHASHI Project.

  • I teach contemporary Asian Cultures to elementary school, middle school, and high school teachers, and I will continue to teach about Japan, incorporations things from this trip in my lessons. These teachers will then hopefully pass this information on to their students. I also advise graduate students on studies, reading Asia, so I will continue to promote Japan as an important country of study. In the future, I hope to promote more East-West civil society capacity building networks.
  • I benefited a lot from the KAKEHASHI project. The project enabled me to gain insight into Japanese history, culture, politics and economics. Without this opportunity, my learning would be only limited to what I could read. This firsthand experience in Japan has also increased my interest in Japan, and I expect that it will lead me to study more about Japan. I also found the trip enjoyable and appreciated the opportunities we had to meet experts and visit important cultural sites. Thank you.

[Contact Us]

The Japan Foundation Youth Exchange Bureau
TEL : +81-(0)3-5369-6022 FAX : +81-(0)3-5369-6042
infokakehashi@jpf.go.jp
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